The Meleke Stone

Gillian Green olgaswan@hotmail.com 818938282043

HISTORICAL FICTION DETECTIVE

Across Centuries

Olga Swan

TaleFlick Pick!

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Logline

A terrorist bomb demolishes a synagogue in Toulouse. An old woman is dying, clutching a meleke stone from ancient Jerusalem. Two men, one Jewish, one Egyptian, meet in France. A film is made highlighting the futility of their centuries-old feud. A meleke stone is returned to Jerusalem.

Genre

Historical Fiction,Detective

Short Summary

The son of an Egyptian market trader in SW France prepares to blow up a synagogue in Toulouse, without realising that years ago his father’s life was saved by an Israeli soldier in the 6 day war in Egypt.


After the death of his son, the old Egyptian travels to Jerusalem in search of the Israeli soldier who saved his life in Egypt. His friend, the filmmaker, returns the meleke stone to its original, ancient resting place in Jerusalem’s old quarter.

Setting

Toulouse, Egypt, Jerusalem

Based on a True Story

No

Plot - Premise

Internal Journey/Rebirth

Plot - Other Elements

Meaningful Message

Mature Audience Themes

Information not completed

Main Character Details

Name: Menes

Age: 75

Gender: Male

Role: Protagonist

Key Traits: Honorable,Visionary

Additional Character Details

Name: Moshe

Age: 75

Gender: Male

Role: Protagonist

Key Traits: Honorable,Heroic,Religious,Visionary

Additional Character Details

Name: Simon

Age: 40

Gender: Male

Role: protagonist

Key Traits: Aspiring,Honorable

Additional Character Details

The author has not yet written this

Development Pitch

This is a story crying out to be heard in the hope it acts as a catalyst for everlasting peace in the Middle East. A terrorist bomb demolishes a synagogue in Toulouse. An old Jewish woman, is dying but is rescued clutching a tiny, ancient meleke stone from Jerusalem. Moshe, a Holocaust survivor, and Menes an Egyptian, become friends whilst living in SW France. But the Toulouse bomb proves the final straw for Moshe, who just misses being a victim. Moshe’s film director son Simon makes a film of how the Jewish people suffered wave after wave of expulsions from their homeland, century after century. In each of his film scenes, a meleke stone is passed to a female from generation to generation. Menes talks to Simon about the Six Day War scene in the film, and how in his own past, a brave Israeli saved his life in Egypt whilst he was serving as part of Nasser’s Egyptian army. However, what Menes doesn’t realise is that the perpetrator of the Toulouse bomb was his own wayward son, Sami. As the police close in on the terrorist crime, they visit Sami in hospital. Sami confesses in tears, saying he doesn’t deserve to live. Menes is mortified that he hadn’t told Sami sooner about how he owes his life to a brave Jewish soldier. Now it’s too late. Despite best efforts, Sami dies. After Moshe’s death, Menes travels to Jerusalem in search of the Israeli soldier who saved his life in Egypt. Simon returns the meleke stone to its original site in Jerusalem.

About The Author

Olga has a B.A. Hons. (Open) in English language and literature. For many years she worked at The University of Birmingham, following which she spent twelve years living in S.W. France before returning to Birmingham in 2017. She has had 7 books (3 NF) published by indie publisher Crooked Cat Books, which has now closed. Three of Olga’s works are narrative non-fiction, one of which (Pensioners in Paradis) is approaching one million pages read and is already a four-times international best-seller. Three novels form a series set in wartime Germany, France and Poland. Blog: olgaswan.blogspot.com Amazon author page: https://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B013IBD4PU/ref=nodl_ Twitter: @olgaolgaswan FB: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009512231796 Instagram: olgaswan8459 https://linktr.ee/OlgaSwan The author name Olga Swan is a nom de plume.

Target Audiences

Age: 55+

Target Gender: Universal

Group Specific

Information not completed

Publishing Details

Status: No

Hard Copy Available

No

ISBN

Information not completed

Genre

DRAMA, RELIGION

Brief

After an angry young man of Egyptian origin causes an explosion in front of a French synagogue, two unlikely friends - a Jew and an Egyptian - must deal with the impacts of the tragedy on their family, at the same time trying to regain and understand old ties and conflicts.

Overall Rating

GOOD

Point of View

THIRD PERSON

Narrative Elements

Authors Writing Style: GOOD

Characterization: GOOD

Commerciality: GOOD

Franchise Potential: FAIR

Pace: FAIR

Premise: EXCELLENT

Structure: FAIR

Theme: EXCELLENT

Accuracy of Book Profile

Yes, it does.

Draw of Story

The main theme, which is not only timely but also developed in an intriguing manner.

Possible Drawbacks

It didn't exactly make me want to stop reading, but the inclusion of too many characters and timelines turns accompanying the narrative into an exaggeratedly complex task.

Use of Special Effects

THE STORY RELIES A LITTLE BIT ON SPECIAL EFFECTS

Primary Hook of Story

The main hook is the friendship between two people whose origins are quite conflicted with each other, as well as the difficulties to resolve differences established by our ancestors, whether for religious or ideological issues.

Fanbase Potential

I don't know if it is possible to talk about fanbase in this case, but certainly the controversial and thought-provoking themes included in this work should have an impact and leave a mark on those who watch the adaptation.

Awards Potential

Yes, it seems to be exactly the type of film that attracts Awards' attention. Whether because of the ideological and political context or because of the family drama that it establishes.

Envisioned Budget

MEDIUM BUDGET

Similar Films/TV Series

IN THE FADE - AN EXPLOSION CAUSED BY NEO-NAZIS KILLS A WOMAN'S FAMILY, LEAVING HER LIFE DEVASTATED. THE ANGEL - AN UNDERCOVER ISRAELI AGENT, THE SON-IN-LAW OF EGYPTIAN PRESIDENT NASSER BECOMES A SPECIAL ADVISOR, SECRETLY SPYING FOR ISRAEL AT THE SAME TIME.

What’s New About the Story

The most original part of this narrative is the fact that it explores a real conflict through the microcosm of small characters, whose life is shrouded in hatred and prejudice inevitably generated by wars of the past. This is what makes the reading interesting and, in that sense, it can already be considered quite original, although it could escape some clichés and common places here and there.

Lead Characters

They are all human beings, with defects and virtues, but frequently trying to make things right. Even major mistakes, such as the attack that starts the narrative, are understandable from the point of view of the character, although never justifiable.

Uniqueness of Story

It's still not a rare gem, but the premise and the characters have the potential to achieve that status. What is presently missing is to better organize the structure of the various narrative lines and characters’ journeys and to dose down the melodrama a little bit.

Possible Formats

Film - Studio, Film - Streaming

Analyst Recommendation

CONSIDER

Justification

I believe that it is important to consider the book for an adaptation in the first place because the main themes treated here are extremely relevant, thought-provoking, and complex. They should attract an audience interested in religious and geopolitical issues, as well as give watchers a broader view of a conflict whose details may be little known to the population in general. In addition, the main conflict is complex and intriguing, with no absolute heroes or villains, but people trapped in a never-ending narrative of hatred and resentment that spans generations. The characters are also presented in a very interesting and profound way, with their motivations well explored by the narrative. This is largely due to the author's great writing style, which captures the reader's attention in several passages. On the other hand, some changes will be necessary for an adaptation to be successful. The main one is to better revise and edit the structure of the narrative. The general impression is that there are too many characters, points of view, and events, which can confuse and disperse the reader's attention. When adapting the material for the screen, it is important to take into account that the narrative needs to be fluid and that the audience must empathize with the characters, which is difficult when you divide the attention too much. It would also be interesting to reduce the melodramatic burden of the story, especially in the final part, which is filled with deaths, some of which apparently unnecessary. The involvement with those events is already at the highest level, so there is no need to stress the emotional part so much, as it may end up sounding exaggerated. Apart from these aspects, which are indeed crucial, the narrative never ceases to be interesting and could make an excellent film in the case of an adaptation.